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Meet the Filmmaker: Ty Bradford, “Sick, Weird, Kid.”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
TB: Ever since I was twelve, I’ve had a camera in hand — to me there’s nothing like telling stories with moving images and sharing that experience with an audience.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
TB: This is a film I made as a project to give back to then senoir LGBTQ community – but it’s meant for all ages. I recently discovered how many seniors are still struggling with being who they are, so I thought it important to share their words of support and wisdom and I must thank the brave folks who were willing to go on camera. It’s been screening at The Center on Colfax, at retirement communities all over the country and it will live on the web.

Q: What else are you working on?
TB: Working with seniors has opened up a whole new realm of interest for me, especially when many of them told me how invisible they felt. I’m currently writing a feature film (drama/dark comedy) that will hopefully change that perspective and the goal is to shoot it here in Denver. If anyone knows of any senior actors (+/- 70 years young) please send them my way!

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
TB: I’m obsessed with warm chocolate chip cookies.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
TB: My company is Ovo Films / https://www.ovofilms.com

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
TB: EFP deserves a standing ovation for supporting local artists and for screening local work.

Sick, Weird, Kid. will screen during The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, November 21st at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Mason Aks, “Tag”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
MA: I have been doing theater my whole life, and after awhile I was noticing that film is a better place to be to get recognized. Your pieces and progress is permanent, and will stay for entertainment for years to come.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
MA: You will be seeing a small video I made challenging myself to not use dialogue for a film.

Q: What else are you working on?
MA: I just finished releasing my first TV pilot, which is a comedic retelling if Grimm’s Fairy Tales. We had a budget of $4,000 and all volunteers for actors and we got it done.

Here is a link: https://youtu.be/yrZW5lUbTns

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
MA: I try to stylize my filmmaking so that the camera tells the jokes instead of only the actors. As I’ve been progressing I’ve been enhancing dialogue delivery, but my comedic filmmaking is still present.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
MA: Two places:

Old World Productions Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Oldworldproductions/

Mildly Adequate YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh2dpwyvjoRqkKlZO_pzNmA

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
MA: Thank you for accepting this film. This is my first short film I’ve ever done and did it with no budget, so I’m very proud of it.

Tag will screen during The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, November 21st at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Lindsay Morrison, “Hi Larry :)”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
LM: I initially got into film via music videos of the 90s. I didn’t necessarily understand it as a career, but the art form intrigued me. Then I took a “Films of David Lynch” course in college and that’s what got me into the idea of directing. I was so inspired by his strange clues and unusual plot structures, and that’s when I finally started making my own short films. Directing for the first time, I was hooked, and pretty soon found myself in Los Angeles, going to film school at USC. I’ve explored many art forms, but film is by far my favorite. I love the ability to bring dream images to life and to tell unusual stories.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
LM: You will be seeing Hi, Larry:) which was my team’s submission to the 2018 Denver 48 Hour Film Project. Team WOLF LUV pulled the horror genre and we were so thrilled because it is our favorite. It screened at the 48 Hour Film Festival that year, of course, and then one other time at the Bug’s Open Screen Night. Our plans are to have it available online so as to spread its joy for many years to come.

Q: What else are you working on?
LM: I recently started a production company with my partner in life and in crime, Michael La Breche. We are WOLF LUV FILMS and we are currently working on an anthology series called Reliquary. We screened the first installment of it at the Bug twice this year, as well as at the H.P. Lovecraft Film Festival in Providence, RI and Portland, OR. We received warm receptions and are thrilled to report that we will go into production mode on episode 2 next month.

We also have been in development on a feature horror film, entitled LATEX and are getting ready to launch into pre-production on that as soon as we secure funding, hopefully early 2020. Meanwhile we are building our production company from the ground up. We recently moved into a larger work space and can’t wait to get shooting again.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
LM: I love my villains and am often caught by my husband quoting my own villain’s lines in every day life, which is probably scary for him since my villains are almost always women and they usually attack men. But don’t worry, my female villains attack women too; they are equal opportunity monsters.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
LM: You can find more WOLF LUV FILMS info and content at wolfluvfilms.com, and you can find my director reel on my personal website: lindsaymorrison.com. Also, please go find us on YouTube and our Instagram accounts (you can find them through our website). Also, please go find us on YouTube and our Instagram accounts (you can find them through our website).

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
LM: I am always grateful for an opportunity to screen at EFP. I think EFP is a vital part of the Denver film community and I am thrilled to be a part of it.

Hi, Larry 🙂 will screen during The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, October 17th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: John McSween, “The Lost Boy”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
JM: When I was 12 years old, I watched the Siskel and Ebert review of Reservoir Dogs. They gave it 2 thumbs down. Both thought it was pointless exercise in style that was full of boring dialogue. But, from the few clips they showed and the movie’s summary, I had to see it. I convinced my mom to rent the R rated VHS at blockbuster and late that night I watched it twice in a row (with the only break the 5 minutes it took to rewind the tape). That was my coming to God moment. To my parents’ chagrin, watching movies became my primary pursuit and watching hours on end of video tapes became my favorite hobby. Up until that point I had wanted to be a painter. It took years before I gave my art supplies away. But, every time I sat in a crowded theater or sat in a crowded living room huddled around a 20 inch television to watch a new release, I became convinced that film had become the culmination of mankind’s artistic pursuits. All the great artists and all the great writers, had they been living in the 1990s, they would have been independent filmmakers.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
JM: The Lost Boy was created in 2014 with a grant from Stanley Film Festival and financial (and spiritual) help from Colorado Film School during my last year there. It was one of two CFS entries into the now defunct Stanley Film Festival. I wrote the screenplay with the incredible Benjamin Dunn under a tight schedule of about 3 weeks in order to apply for the grant. Benjamin and I worked as a writing team because we both focused our stories on friendships and familial relationships. When we started The Lost Boy, we had been already been talking about writing a script about a father and a son in which the father ends up being the villain even though he sees himself as the victim. 2014 was also the beginning of the current trend of all films being based on pre-existing intellectual property. Ben and I wanted to tap into that Zeitgeist and we wanted to tell a story about the family and relationship dynamics that turn good kids bad. Our solution was to create a modern day retelling of the Peter Pan origin story in the horror genre with a focus on the family dynamic that would lead Peter down a dark path.

We went into production about 6 weeks after the screenplay won the Stanley grant in order to finish the movie in time for the festival and in order to work with the marvelous Emeli Emanuelson, whose schedule was booked. Emeli was not only an amazing actor, but she ended up doing as much as anyone for this short to come into being. Ben and I started working with DP Luke Askelson at an early point in the creative process. We decided before the script was complete that the movie would be shot in black and white, which was great for the short’s aesthetic but became a non-starter for using the short as a concept trailer for a feature length film. Production designer Cameron Styles and Art Director Darren McCoy took the heavy lifting of creating costumes, props, and set decorations in just over a month on a very limited budget.

Our original shooting location fell through at the last minute, which almost ended up killing the project. Luckily, in the 11th hour, a family friend agreed to let the cast and crew of 40 people crash at his ranch for a weekend. The new location threw numerous wrenches and surprises at us for the whole shoot, but producer Alex Rhodes-Wilmer was able to make it work. Primary production lasted 3 days and 2 nights. Most of the movie was shot at night in the winter at 8,500 feet outside of Woodland Park. It was cold. The kids were up past their bedtimes and their costumes exposed their bare skin to below freezing temperatures. Many of the scenes needed to be re-thought out and re-orchestrated outside on set 2 AM while it was 20 degrees in order to accomodate the new location.

Editor Ellen Feldman, Darren McCoy, Alex, and I sat in the editing booth for weeks trying to sculpt all that raw footage into a movie, which we did lust in time for the festival. The movie had a short festival run premiering at The Stanley Film Festival and playing at a few smaller genre festivals including the Mile High Horror Fest and the Minneapolis Underground Film Festival. Benjamin and I worked on several different versions of the feature length version of the The Lost Boy. Unfortunately, we never found the money to take it to the next level. The Lost Boy ended up being the last narrative film I directed.

Q: What else are you working on?
JM: I work as an independent videographer / editor.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
JM: There’s a Starbucks cup in every scene.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
JM: I own the domain www.johnmcsween.com, which will one day have information about me and my work. Until then, leave messages for me at the front desk of the Bug Theatre.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
JM: I showed my first movie at the EFP back in 2008. Patrick Sheridan made fun of me for the whole night. I thought that meant that we had become friends, he had different ideas. Over the years, I screened about a half dozen shorts at the EFP and Patrick made fun of me every time. Patrick became a friend, mentor, and co-creator. I sent him every script I ever wrote and he gave me honest notes. The greatest compliment I ever got from him was actually for the script of The Lost Boy. He told me that “It’s actually not that bad.” I asked him for actors for every movie I ever directed and he never failed to send me actors who were completely different than I had envisioned, but who ended up being perfect for the part. I even cast him a couple of times. I remember my last time working with him – me as director, Patrick as actor – at the Bug Theatre, during a shoot for a short film called The Fame Machine. I asked him to play a scene a certain way. He said that he would be happy to play it that way or that we could just cut to the chase and he could do it the right way. That way, he said, I wouldn’t have to look at so much footage during post. I let him do it his way, and he was right. He got film. He got acting. He will be missed.

The Lost Boy will screen during The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, October 17th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Jared Vigil, “Hopeless”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
JV: I became a filmmaker to tell stories that inspire creativity and change in my community and the world around me.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
JV: At the EFP we are going to see the animated horror short titled Hopeless. This short has not been screened before, and I hope the audience enjoys the movie and finds it entertaining.

Q: What else are you working on?
JV: In addition to my client work my personal projects consist of a cartoon comedy series I’m developing. A couple live action short films and a documentary about the Chicano and Lowriding Culture in Colorado.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
JV: One weird thing about me is I’m never locked down to one film position or style. I enjoy all aspects of filmmaking. And I feel my work reflects that.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
JV: People can go to my website www.DenverMediaSolutions.com or YouTube channel www.YouTube.com/JaeSlow to see what I’m working on.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
JV: This is the 3rd film the Emerging Filmmakers Project has showcased of mine. And I can not express my gratitude enough!! I love their platform and how they use it to spotlight Colorado filmmakers!! THANK YOU

Hopeless will screen during The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, October 17th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Kelsey Bliss, “Steampunk Cowboy”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
KB: I took a film class about making a silent film at the Elitch Theatre Academy and I ended up as the director of Steampunk Cowboy. I have also been helping my Dad, Michael Bliss, with his films and I like making movies.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
KB: We are going to see a Silent Film about a Steampunk Cowboy that travels through time to find his lost dog. This film has screened in 3 film festivals including the Colorado Independent Woman of Film Festival.

Q: What else are you working on?
KB: Helping my Dad with his new film Hush Little Baby.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
KB: Our main actor Kaelen got hurt on the first scene of Steampunk Cowboy because Lola (The star dog in the movie) pulled him and he didn’t want to let go. Kaelen was a trooper and we finished shooting everything in one day.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
KB: You can see what we are doing at ETFest.com. We are working on saving the Historic Elitch Theatre

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
KB: I first meet Patrick Sheridan at EFP and then I took acting classes with him. I learned a lot from him and I miss him so much!

Steampunk Cowboy will screen during The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, August 15th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker”: Alexander Rhodes-Wilmere, “Rations”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
ARW: The 70s and 80s movies I grew up watching just made me want to live in those worlds. At some point I realized if I really wanted to see a certain kind of movie I was probably going to get saddled with making it. It’s just the greatest thing in the world.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
ARW: Rations is about two young girls struggling to keep their mother alive during a devastating drought after water rations are suddenly delayed. It premiered at Denver Film Festival in 2016 and since it’s had a decent little festival run around the country. The last handful of screenings are coming up now and then we’re putting it online this October 17th.

Q: What else are you working on?
ARW: Right now we’re developing some new feature films that I hope we can talk about soon. I’m excited about how that’s coming along but there’s a lot more to do. I’m also in the midst promoting our new film Mama, filmed entirely in Beijing. Nikie Perlmutter (the writer and co-producer of Rations) is about to direct a film she wrote called A Ceremony for Me, You and Everyone We Knew and I’m excited about that one too.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
ARW: I hope my movies feel like a bit of a fantasy. I hope they feel big, like larger than life scenarios but with small stories that hit on a emotional level. I also hope each one feels different than the last.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
ARW: ARWorks Motion Picture Company is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Youtube and Vimeo. You can also see more soon at ARWorksfilm.com

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
ARW: The Bug and The Emerging Filmmakers Project has been and will probably always be Denvers ultimate hub for independent work, excellent networking and a reminder that the community here truly loves what they do. Infinite inspiration.

Rations will screen during The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, August 15th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Bill Johnson, “Night Fishermen”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
BJ: I became a film maker to give people a voice about their life or their cause. I spent decades as a large format landscape photographer and moving into video allows me to hear the sounds and voices of people in the landscape. I particularly enjoy showing the world through the eyes of others.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
BJ: Night Fishermen is a a story about three fishermen who have fished all their lives and why they go out to stand on a cliff by the ocean in the middle of the night. It has screened at the Peak Film Forum and is submitted to film festivals through Film Freeway.

Q: What else are you working on?
BJ: I do documentary style videos of fashion designers, models, musicians and dancers in the Denver area.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
BJ: It took ten years of returning to Hawaii for two weeks at a time to develop the relationships and obtain all of the time-lapse footage used in Night Fishermen. I too love standing on a cliff by the ocean in the middle of the night.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
BJ: My web site is billjohnsonstories.com and my Facebook Page is billjohnsonstories.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
BJ: I’m glad you are there as an outlet for emerging filmmakers.

Night Fishermen will screen during The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, August 15th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Benjamin Neufeld, “The Intern”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
BN: I have always loved movies, but I have not always wanted to be a filmmaker. Growing up I thought maybe I would be a comedian, maybe a writer, I flirted with the idea of rocket physicist. When I got to high school I had settled on becoming a journalist. I had friends who expressed interest in film making; but they aimed their passion more towards the technical capabilities of modern cameras and special effects. I found what they talked about interesting, but not as a potential career path. What I always loved was storytelling. In my tenth grade English class my teacher assigned the class a group project to write, film and edit a short film. I blew off most of my other homework to focus on writing a script, that ended up being 30 pages long, about a high school student who wanted to beat up and humiliate a classmate in an underground fight club in order to steal his date to the prom. I thought the script was fantastic. It was okay. But I was so excited about the idea that I realized maybe I should try to be a screenwriter. This led to me deciding to go to CU Denver to study film. And, as I continued to brainstorm and work on movie ideas, I thought I might as well be the one to make the movies that I write.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
BN: I have always loved movies, but I have not always wanted to be a filmmaker. Growing up I thought maybe I would be a comedian, maybe a writer, I flirted with the idea of rocket physicist. When I got to high school I had settled on becoming a journalist. I had friends who expressed interest in film making; but they aimed their passion more towards the technical capabilities of modern cameras and special effects. I found what they talked about interesting, but not as a potential career path. What I always loved was storytelling. In my tenth grade English class my teacher assigned the class a group project to write, film and edit a short film. I blew off most of my other homework to focus on writing a script, that ended up being 30 pages long, about a high school student who wanted to beat up and humiliate a classmate in an underground fight club in order to steal his date to the prom. I thought the script was fantastic. It was okay. But I was so excited about the idea that I realized maybe I should try to be a screenwriter. This led to me deciding to go to CU Denver to study film. And, as I continued to brainstorm and work on movie ideas, I thought I might as well be the one to make the movies that I write.

Q: What else are you working on?
BN: Currently I am using my time off from school to develop a few scripts. I am working on a feature length script which I hope to produce the summer before my senior year. I am also writing/outlining four different short film scripts. One is a short version of the feature script. One is a short version of a feature script I will eventually write. All four are potential scripts for me to make in my sophomore production class, or independently, this fall or next summer.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
BN: I believe that in order to tell good stories a storyteller must experience the world and people around them. (That’s not weird, that’s just a way of me saying I like to/want to travel). I also grew up very outdoorsy, and have been a rock climber since high school. That is why after high school I took a gap year in which I worked, then lived in a van for six months to drive around the west coast and rock climb. It was a wonderful experience that has prepared me for the fact that I will probably have to live in a car when I eventually move to LA.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
BN: People can follow my Instagram: @benjamin.neufeld.photography. There I post pictures I have taken casually or professionally, and info/updates about my films.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
BN: I am extremely excited to be a part of the EFP. I have heard great things from my teachers at CU Denver. I am proud to be a part of the growing Denver film scene.

The Intern will screen during The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, August 15th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Emiliano Acevedo, “Apocalypse Lego Frozen Terror Ep1”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
EA: I was a kid just messing around with toys and a camera, then I got better at it and began to enjoy the process of storytelling.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
EA: Apocalypse Lego is the first episode of a sci fi series I started years ago. This is the “remastered” version. I got a new composure, Tim Girard, who did an amazing job.

Q: What else are you working on?
EA: I am working on the sixth episode of the same series, as well as a Conan Vs Zombies project.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
EA: I yell at my Legos when they don’t cooperate.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
EA: My YouTube channel under Virgeo1228

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
EA: EFP has been such a great event and I’m so grateful anytime I get to be a part of it.

Apocalypse Lego Frozen Terror Ep1 will screen during The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, August 15th at The Bug Theatre.