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Meet the Filmmaker: William Briggs, “Silk” (teaser)

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
WB: We would visit my creative older cousins in the summers and we would make crazy kiddish films on super-8. We did super hero films, and Dungeons & Dragons, mad scientists. And then when VHS came out I wrote and directed our first talkie Dracula’s Daughter, as well as two 20 minute episodes of Doctor Who.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
WB: This is a 3-minute “teaser” for Silk a 30-minute short film noir in pre-production. It’s the debut and we’re going to post it to raise some funding for a real location shoot, etc.

Q: What else are you working on?
WB: Other than full steam ahead on Silk, I am writing a magic-fu action film next, hoping to do a little green-screen and wire-work, with other seed ideas already in the pipeline. Be gestation time is great.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
WB: Well, if I ever get a studio started I’ll probably call it Silent Sickies because that’s what we called the old Super-8 films. Also, that Dr. Who film? Yeah, I sent it to Tom Baker who was gracious enough to actually write me a post card which I’ve kept ever since.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
WB: I am silent.sickies@gmail.com and have a YouTube channel as well where I will start uploading those films over time for my cousins to see.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
WB: It’s an awesome forum for everyone to get their visions seen by all — I’ve been coming for a year-and-a-half and its always so friendly and collaborative — it’s just a great experience to be up close and personal with local film makers!

Silk (teaser) will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, November 15th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Nancy Fingerhood, “Mile High Nancy Episode 6: Mom Jeans and Comedy Dreams”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
NF: I enjoy seeing my stories come to life and the creative process of brainstorming with others.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
NF: It is the sixth episode of the web series Mile High Nancy. This is the first screening. It will be on the US Weed Channel.

Q: What else are you working on?
NF: I just wrapped up acting and casting for a new web series called It’s So Brighton.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
NF: One of my actors does an amazing job as a rapper.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
NF: Go to my youtube channel Mile High Nancy.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
NF: I am grateful for the opportunity EFP gives to local filmmakers.

Mile High Nancy Episode 6: Mom Jeans and Comedy Dreams will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, November 15th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Rion Smith, “Rebeccah’s Statement”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
RS: Because I love telling stories and am a visual person.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
RS: It is scheduled to show in Portland Oregon at the HP Lovecraft Film Festival Oct 5, so this will be the second showing on the big screen.

Q: What else are you working on?
RS: Another Lovecraft adaption, but told from the monster’s point of view.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
RS: I can speak Mayan. Seriously.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
RS: Search my name on youtube, I’m the only Rion Smith.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
RS: Love you guys!

Rebeccah’s Statement will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, October 18th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Lewis Leslie, “Mental”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
LL: I have always loved movies. From an early age, I connected with the stories and the characters, and began following actors and directors whose work I admired. I began writing in my early 20s, and instantly fell in love with it. I read all the books, and wrote and wrote and wrote, until I decided that I was ready to start showing my work to people. By age 32, writing alone wasn’t satisfying my creative urges, so I tried my hand at directing. It immediately became a passion that still burns stronger every day nearly a decade later.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
LL: We are screening the psychological horror film Mental. Logline: “When professional insomniac Ty (Emmy-nominated T.O.N.E-z) Brown’s music career hits a slump, he grows frustrated by his future step-daughter’s erratic behavior, and must confront her in order to bring harmony back to the household.” Mental has been submitted to the Telluride Horror Show and Sundance Film Festival, as well as a number of smaller film festivals. It is also being screened for a select group of Hollywood executives.

Q: What else are you working on?
LL: Dream Hero Productions has three feature films in post-production (Strange Company, Battered, Sinners, Inc.), another in development, and we are shooting the short film Deuces about a hobo clown who confronts the grim reaper the weekend of October 20th, 2018.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
LL: Despite being a devout Christian, I have a tendency to gravitate toward the horror genre, where I find the most entertainment and enjoyment from a filmmaking and audience member standpoint.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
LL: You can purchase my first film Killer Ink, which features Peter (Chewbacca) Mayhew, on Amazon, and visit the Facebook page for Dream Hero Productions at www.facebook.com/dreamheroproductions as well as mental at www.facebook.com/mentalhorrormovie

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
LL: The EFP has been a staple in the Denver filmmaking scene for a long time. It was the first place that was willing to screen my short films, and it continues to grow and nurture the local filmmaking community like no other event that I’ve discovered. I am grateful for the EFP, and the encouragement it has brought to my career through the years. Thanks, EFP!

Mental will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, October 18th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Jacob Thompson, “Not for Me”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
JT: Movies have always been my passion for as long as I can remember. I’ve always wanted to be a filmmaker ever since I was a little kid and it’s an aspiration that’s stuck with me to this day. I make films because I enjoy making them. You could say to my face that I make the worst movies ever made and it wouldn’t discourage me.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
JT: You’re going to be seeing Not for Me, an experimental project that my good friend, Christian Hutchins, and I worked on for six months back in 2017. You can currently view it on Youtube, Vimeo, and my personal website.

Q: What else are you working on?
JT: I have a script written for an untitled horror/comedy short film. When or if it’ll ever get off the ground remains to be certain. Aside from that, I have plenty of ideas for other films, but nothing concrete. I work part-time and go to community college and don’t have as much downtime as I used to so that makes potential projects rather difficult. I edit a lot in my spare time, but it’s mostly video game fan trailers or really crappy memes that make my inner child snicker. Those are always fun though and a really great way to refine your editing skills.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
JT: Honestly when it comes to storytelling in my films, I just kinda do whatever the hell I feel like doing. I’m a pretty weird person so naturally my films typically have a weird idiosyncratic sort of style to them. I feel it helps them stand out a bit more. My previous films were primarily comedies or quirky dramas and Not for Me is the first dead serious film I’ve done in this style. It was an interesting process to say the least.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
JT: You can view it on my Vimeo page named after myself or go to my personal website: http://jakebt1998.wixsite.com/jacob-thompson

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
JT: I’m super ecstatic that you’ve chosen my film in your lineup. I think what you’re doing is a great way to get your work out there and connect with other members of the Colorado filmmaking community.

Not For Me will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, October 18th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Andrew Tennison, “The Sear”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
AT: When I was about four years old, I watched Leonard Maltin interview George Lucas on the Star Wars VHS tapes that came out, and the way they talked about movies seemed really “adult”, so I figured filmmaking was a serious and realistic profession for grown-ups. That’s around the time that movies took ahold of me – filmmaking was a language I immediately took to heart.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
AT: You’re going to see a movie I wrote and directed called The Sear, which is a student short that was made at CU Denver. It’s about a couple’s relationship getting torn apart by two fortune teller machines. We shot it all in a basement belonging to two of my childhood friends – Alex and Stephen Klein, who also star in the movie. So far, it’s been screened at our school’s Cinefest film festival, which was in May, and it’s up on YouTube. I plan on submitting it to a few more festivals this year.

Q: What else are you working on?
AT: I’m writing another short right now. For this one I’ll have double the amount of time to make the film than I did on my last two, so it’s gonna be a wild ride.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
AT: I’m a famous naysayer of the “shot list”, which is a list of shots you write out before you shoot a movie. For me, a shot list is kind of a hassle and a waste of time. When you’re behind a computer trying to figure out what shots are gonna work on set without actually being on set, the whole thing feels fruitless and I feel like a dunce. So on my past two films, I usually just feel out the shots while I’m there on set.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
AT: You can subscribe to my YouTube channel, which I’ve named after myself – Andrew Tennison. I also make music as majordomo (lowercase), and you can find my songs on SoundCloud.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
AT: Thank you for having me! I went to the January EFP and had a great time, so I’m looking forward to this one.

The Sear will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, August 15th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Antoine M. Dillard, “Gotta Make It”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
AD: I became a filmmaker because I wanted to tell stories. I wanted to make people, smile, laugh, feel, and be introduced to worlds and perspectives that they’ve never seen or thought about

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
AD: You’re going to see part of the journey of Kendall Graham. A film student with exception skill trying to find his place in the film industry. So far it has been screened in Italy and has won a few awards and nominations. Right now it’s on Amazon Prime Video & OpPrime TV streaming services. No other plans than to get in front of as many eyeballs as possible.

Q: What else are you working on?
AD: Right now I’m at the tail end of Rise of the Avalanche: Revenge from the Shadows and developing my first feature film Crazy Weapon 5: Back for the First Time.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
AD: Both films that I’ve released so far have been shot in my home.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
AD: They can go to QuantumVisualFx.com

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
AD: I think The Emerging Filmmakers Project is excellent! There aren’t many outlets for independent filmmakers locally in general and I’m so happy an organization like this exists so that filmmakers have a platform express themselves through film.

Gotta Make It will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, August 15th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Blaise Bowers, “Whoopie”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
BB: Because I love creating and sharing my story’s with other people. I started out as an actor and while on film sets I enjoyed watching the process from behind the camera. It’s fun acting, but I also have fun making movies. I’m only 11, but I hope to continue making films and acting.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP?
BB: Whoopie is a short film about my dog Whoopie. It was made as my entry to DSA cinema arts program for 6th grade. The goal was to write, direct and edit original material. It’s a comedy projecting human feelings into a dog. My sister is playing herself, my mom is the voice of Whoopie and My dad played himself as well.

Q: Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
BB: I played the video at my 5th-grade student showcase and at DSA audition. I hope you enjoy it. I’m thinking about a Whoopie 2 I’m still working on the story and training the dog because she was not an easy “actor” to work with, we had to bribe her with a lot of food to make that video. The video had to be less than 2 minutes, so I had to remove some story we had shot. Originally it was going to show what Whoopie did for the gap in time you see in the video, but for time and keeping the story focused on the main topic I had to remove it, but I would love to make Whoopie 2 and add those scenes.

Q: What else are you working on?
BB: I have a couple of projects in which I’m still writing and casting. One is a music video parody of “Welcome to the Jungle”- “Welcome to Hiyoshi”- we spent 2 weeks in Japan last year and I came up with a funny music video. My mom helped me write the lyrics and we shot raw footage of the city of Hiyoshi and we asked strangers to be in the video. We wrote down things that were in that town and things that stood out to us in Japan like their TINY TINY cars. I’m hoping to record the music and finish the video this fall. It goes like “Welcome to Hiyoshi, we got fun and food. We got everything you want, daily marts too, we are the people who can buy, whatever they may need- Daily Yamakasi honey may have what you need… in Hiyoshi, welcome to Hiyoshi, won’t you come with nana nan a mee mee”

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
BB: Well, I can be described as “weird” by people but I think I’m just unique. I think we are all weird in one way or another. I enjoy horror movies, role-playing games, karaoke, tap dancing… but to me, that’s not weird, that’s just me.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
BB: My Youtube channel is called “TheLifeofBlaise” all together in one word. I post videos I have worked on as an actor, things I have done myself and I’m hoping to add more with time. Thank you for having me today, this is a great honor.

Whoopie will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, July 19th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Shaelene Salazar, “Trust Me”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
SS: I wasn’t planning on becoming a filmmaker, but taking various classes kind of shifted my viewpoint a little bit.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
SS: This has only been shown in the class we made it in. The idea behind it was different at first, but has a twist that shifts the tone a little bit.

Q: What else are you working on?
SS: I have three projects underway.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
SS: You’ll see.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
SS: Stay tuned and info will be out soon!

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
SS: The EFP is a really great way to get out there and network. It’s a fun experience for everyone!

Trust Me will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, July 19th at The Bug Theatre.