0

Meet the Filmmaker: Angelo Guglielmo, “The Monolith”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
AG: I was born as the eleventh child in a family of eleven. A big Italian family with a full cast of whacky characters–it was like growing up in a Fellini movie.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
AG: My film The Monolith is a doc short about my next door neighbor here in Manhattan. The idea for the film came over morning coffee visits. While she was telling me about this major loss of her view, I could see the visuals: an artist, the skyline view, a building. The film has been popular on Vimeo, screened around the world in festivals and won a few awards, too!

Q: What else are you working on?
AG: I’m currently filming a doc about a survivor from the Century 16 Shooting. It has been pretty intense with a lot of twists and turns. I’ve adapted my book and documentary The Woman Who Wasn’t There into a screenplay and shopping it.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
AG: Let’s see: currently, I’m listening to that Justin Bieber song “I Don’t Care” on repeat. I am a huge Streisand fan and have a project I need to post called “Let go and Let Barbra.”

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
AG: www.vimeo.com/AngeloG/themonolith and directedbyangelo on Instagram.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
AG: I’m honored to be screening here and hope the audience is tough on my film.

The Monolith will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, May 16th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Jon Casler, “Paul Rivaz Gets Back Up”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
JC: I was taking a game development class in 2011 where we made animations with the video game engines. It was by far my favorite class, so I resolved to go to film school in the future to learn how to make ‘real’ live action movies. 5 years later, I’m still making movies!

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
JC: This film has never had a public screening. It was my documentary production project for Colorado film school for the fall 2015 semester. I knew I wanted to do a film about a comedian, because I love comedy and comedy shows. Fortunately, Paul Rivaz, who I had met only a few months before, agreed to do it, though he told me he thought his life was boring and nothing was going to happen. Then, during the course of the filming, his acting mentor Mike Nuccio died, and he landed a job in Africa, and was preparing to make that move, in addition to trying to survive at the low paying job he held at the time. I filmed so much material it was very overwhelming to try to cut it down to 8 minutes for the class. I also wasn’t very skilled at screenwriting back then, so I wasn’t satisfied with my class cut. I kept working on the film off and on for about another year. I finished a second cut, and a few months later the hard drive it was stored on got corrupted. Fortunately, I uploaded a copy to youtube in case this happened. Unfortunately, I still wasn’t happy with the cut. Because it was an interim cut, there’s some jumpy edits that are now unfortunately baked into the film forever. I may film the Q and A and add it to the film, because Paul’s life has gotten a lot better since 2015, and it would make for a perfect happy ending. Because the footage was destroyed, I don’t have any more plans for screenings in the future, except for Paul’s wedding, if that ever happens.

Q: What else are you working on?
JC: I’m working on writing and producing my own shorts, webseries, and documentaries. I am also figuring out how to backup all of my professional footage that remains, which is about 20 TB! Right now, I am deciding between a FreeNAS RAID server, LTO tape, or archival Blu-Ray. I have an upcoming project about a man in Utah who rescues, hunts, and keeps Mink as pets. I want to use Paul and some people I met in acting class in an upcoming bromance short. I’m a big proponent of the American Film Market, so I’m also creating a concept for a feature to make and sell there.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
JC: This movie was the first time I was part of the crew that captured the last professional footage of someone who died soon after. It’s happened again twice more.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
JC: Paul helped to build me a website, HeadlinerMedia.com, though I never update it. After this screening, I resolve to get it updated!

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
JC: It’s important for filmmakers to support each other in Denver because there’s not a broad consensus in the general population of the value of film production in this state. They like watching it, but not funding or helping it’s creation, which is a real shame, because Colorado has so much to offer for film here. So we just have to do the best we can through projects like the EFP, which do get seen by national industry people. In fact, one of the Walking Dead crew told me that I should focus on getting a film into the EFP, he was very impressed by what he saw.

Paul Rivaz Gets Back Up will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, May 16th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Richard Corso, “The New World Order”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
RC: To add my own words to the famous Kubrick quote: making a film is hard. Plain and simple. But in my line of work there is no greater thrill in life than seeing the characters you created come to life on screen. Telling stories, in my opinion is what makes us human. Continuing the story is what storytellers do. Who we are and what we create is nothing more than matter. In time, the film we shoot on, the paintings we paint, the pyramids we build, will eventually go back into the ground of a rock that is floating in space. And as sad as that is, it truly is a nice little thought that for a small point in an infinite time, we had the pleasure to add to the mound of future dirt, for some species to find millions of years from now.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
RC: The film screening at EFP is The New World Order, a film adaptation of Harold Pinter’s political satire of the same title. This dark comedy stars Cody Dermon & Haydn Winston as two Englishmen with unknown goals of fascistic tendencies who discuss in bullish tones what they intend to do to a third man, who sits gagged, blindfolded and bound to a chair. The acts of violence and abuse referred to are present in the speech rather than the action but an oppressive air of menace persists.

Q: What else are you working on?
RC: I am currently in post-production of a film, titled Cassidy Blues. A collaboration between Kareem Kamahl-Taylor and myself. Cassidy Blues draws inspirations from 60’s French New Wave as well as high-octane American Cop dramas of the 70’s. The story follows two detectives (played by Gabe Combs & Brian McGee) who are chasing a ‘Bonnie & Clyde’ criminal couple (played by Mandy Groves & Asha Bee) their only lead: a pack of cigarettes known as Cassidy Blues.

I am also in pre-production of a surreal adventure comedy, titled Three, to Cairo. The epilogue to a Hollywood epic, Three to Cairo is an absurdist exploration of communication – not only why it fails and where that failure leads, but also the strange and quirky universals that bring people together – games, ambition, travel, and literal and figurative thirst. By showing its diverse characters on a simple path to a common destination, Three, to Cairo dives into the intricacies of that basic human need: connection.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
RC: Website: www.richardcorsofilm.com
Vimeo: vimeo.com/richardcorso
Facebook: www.facebook.com/richardcorso.film
Instagram: www.instagram.com/richiethereptilianplant

The New World Order will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, May 16th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Lewis Leslie, “Deuces”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
LL: Since an early age, I had a fascination with the people behind the scenes. I followed actors and directors that I liked, and developed a Rolodex in my head of my favorites. Once I learned that, in this day-and-age, it was possible to make movies outside the studio system, I did my research, and went to work. I started out writing screenplays, and in 2010, was fortunate enough to direct my first feature, Killer Ink. From there, I was hooked!

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
LL: Deuces stars Marc Bilker & Andrew Roth. “When dejected circus clown Deuces is awoken by a mysterious stranger, he soon finds himself in a battle of wits with the Angel of Death, and must find a way to defeat the stranger, or risk losing what’s left of his soul.” It’s currently on a festival run, which began with the film winning best cinematography at the Colorado Short Circuit Film Fest in CO Springs. Deuces is also screening at BlissFest333 in August.

Q: What else are you working on?
LL: Dream Hero Productions has one short film One Way & 3 features Strange Company, Battered, and Sinners, Inc. in post-production. We are also in development on two new feature films: The Dying Fields (Billy Blair & Emmy-nominated T.O.N.E-z in talks), and our exorcism film Cross to Bear (Bill Oberst Jr. in talks), as well as a couple more shorts coming down the pipeline before long.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
LL: I gravitate toward psychological thrillers and horror films, but have been known to make a few dramas and faith-based films from time-to-time.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
LL: Dream Hero Productions can be most easily found at www.dreamheroproductions.com, but we are also on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
LL: The EFP has been Denver’s premier showcase of new and developing talent in the Denver area for many years. It’s always an entertaining and exciting display of what Colorado has to offer the world of film. Check it out, and support local artists!

Deuces will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, May 16th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Alec Ybarra, Prism of “Light”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
AY: I became a filmmaker because I have always been inspired to tell thought provoking stories through cinema.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
AY: Tonight, my second film Prism of Light will be screened at EFP. It has been released on Vimeo and YouTube; this is the first screening of the film in front of a live audience. The film will also play at several more film festivals this year.

Q: What else are you working on?
AY: My first feature film titled Unmarked will be released worldwide on July 16 by Summer Hill Entertainment. I will be going into production on my next thriller film, When I Held the Key, this June. The story follows a conniving bed and breakfast owner who terrorizes guests in an attempt to hold a position of power.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
AY: I am one of the youngest professional film producers working in the industry and all of my films are inspired by real experiences in some way, shape or form.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
AY: People can visit the New Direction Cinema and Alec Ybarra Facebook pages, as well as follow national and international news headlines and film awards ceremonies.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
AY: The Emerging Filmmakers Project is a great place to screen Colorado made films and is a fantastic place to network. I look forward to attending future events at EFP.

Prism of Light will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, April 18th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Maggie Daniels, “‘Tanglewood’ Proof of Concept”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
MD: Memories for me, particularly bad ones, play like home movies in my mind. After years of watching replays in my own head, or as my doctor calls it PTSD. I just needed everyone to see the world within my mind. As a way to filter it out of my head. Since I’ve put this on paper, it’s like I’ve finally separated myself from a pain I thought would never go away. That burden is now the characters’ weight to carry. To put it simply I have to write films for my own peace of mind.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
MD: I am screening the Tanglewood proof of concept trailer. The EFP is the first to screen. The plans are to show investors what I can do and have them join the project to make the feature.

Q: What else are you working on?
MD: Tanglewood Feature. Planning to start principal photography in June.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
MD: The music composers were the first crew members on board with Tanglewood. In the proof of concept trailer I used both of them as the main characters. This allowed them to embody the characters and they wrote the song for the trailer on the two days of shooting.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
MD: Maggie Daniels
Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/maggielogic/

Tanglewood
Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/tanglewoodmovie/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/tanglewoodmovie/

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
MD: I have attended many Emerging Filmmakers Project Screenings at the Bug Theatre. It is a really good feeling to now be apart of the lineup.

Tanglewood (proof of concept) will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, April 18th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Thomas Crandall, “Breaking Barriers”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
TC: I became a filmmaker because I love how it gives me a unique, intimate perspective on different people. I love its flow, rigor, collaboration, and ultimately, I love having a finished product to share and inspire others. It’s such an engaging, empathetic medium.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
TC: I’m screening my promo video for a dance performance called Breaking Barriers; being a promo video, it hasn’t screened anywhere else! Except online. The dancers loved the video and it helped bring a lot of people to see their performance, so I’m happy.

Q: What else are you working on?
TC: I’m currently developing a short documentary concept about our relationship with our parents, and how we engage in that relationship, though it is still in early stages.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
TC: I’m developing a strange liking toward REALLY terrible b-movies, and the most entertaining I’ve seen recently is called Atlantic Rim (Pacific Rim ripoff).

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
TC: I freelance shoot and edit, and my website is nightwatchmedia.com; you can also find me on vimeo at vimeo.com/thomascrandall.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
TC: Thanks so much to the EFP for being open to screen even promotional videos/ other content; it’s so nice having an audience and getting that live feedback! Keeps me making films and coming back to the Bug!

Breaking Barriers will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, April 18th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Don Markus, “Trevor & Janelle”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
DM: As an actor and improviser in Chicago, it was a natural progression to get behind the camera and start creating content. For me, filmmaking is an extension of acting, and all under the umbrella of storytelling.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
DM: It’s a short comedy poking fun at a Denver couple who have no idea what they’re doing in the mountains. Logline: Ill-prepared for the mountains, Trevor & Janelle realize they’ve brought the wrong map, are lost, and have dwindling food rations.

Q: What else are you working on?
DM: Currently working on a handful of short films and pushing towards a first feature film.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
DM: This short was completely improvised by the fabulous Wolfgang Stein & Stephanie Jones. I had a loose outline: This is the moment you realize you’re lost. Now what? My wonderful wife Brittany Markus and I were behind the camera and Spencer Nelson ran audio. Once we got set, we essentially said to Wolf and Stephanie, “Ok, go.” They then did what they do best! You can, and should, go see Stephaine in Barkley & Makeshift Shakespeare at https://voodoocomedy.com/ You can catch Wolf around town often at Voodoo as well.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
DM: https://www.joywreck.com/narrative-films/trevor-janelle
https://www.instagram.com/joywreck/
https://twitter.com/JOYWRECK
https://www.facebook.com/JOYWRECK/
https://vimeo.com/joywreck
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5KwogcO__gBK2b5fAm_PTg

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
DM: Thank you so much for having us. It is great to have a place like The Emerging Filmmakers Project for us filmmakers to show our work.

Trevor & Janelle will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, April 18th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Bill Johnson, “Pickup Man”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
BJ: I have been a landscape photographer since I was a teenager with most of my work using a large format camera.  When it became difficult to travel with film after 911, I switched to digital cameras and discovered video.  Video allows me to do stories about people in the landscape and I learn about different ways of life.  I find video is much more complex than photography and gives me greater creative opportunities.  

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?

BJ: Pickup Man is a four year effort that brought me to Colorado from Los Angeles.  It is a story about a family that has ranched on the Plains of Colorado for over a hundred years and is facing a historic drought.   I lived with them for months at a time in all seasons of the year.  Rodeo is an integral part of their lives, and I followed the protagonist, Jessica Mosher, as she competed throughout Colorado, Wyoming, and Texas.  Pickup Man premiered at Blissfest in 2017 where it was voted the Best Documentary, and it is a semi-finalist in the documentary category and will be shown in the Utah Film Festival on April 6.  There is a longer Director’s cut version of the movie that I also offer to festivals through Film Freeway.

Q: What else are you working on?

BJ: I grew up in Hawaii and visit every year.  That has resulted in Night Fishermen, a story about those who go out at night to stand on a cliff by the edge of the sea.  It is from the perspective of three life long fishermen as they each face aging.  It will premier at this year’s Colorado Short Circuit Film Festival on March 29 and 30th.
I have co-produced a fashion show at Denver Open Media for the past three years and completed over three dozen profiles on designers and others in the fashion industry here in Denver.  I have also started doing stories about dancers and musicians that I post on Vimeo.  I find that in doing documentary stories, background video to illustrate interviews is essential.  I need access to people’s daily lives and sometimes that takes time or doesn’t happen.  I often have to wait for the action to come to me, so I work on many stories at a time.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?

BJ: I am fascinated by the combination of sound and images into movies.  When I am wearing a headset and listening to the environment around me, I can hear so much better than in real life.  It has become a vicarious thrill to do sound.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?

BJ: I recently completed a new web site, billjohnsonstories.com, and people can see the best of my past work as well as recent efforts.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?

BJ: I am thankful that The Emerging Filmmakers Project is here.  It gives me a forum to share my work and learn from the work of others as well as meet the moviemaking community of Colorado.

Pickup Man will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, March 21st at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Don Markus, “Trevor & Janelle”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?

Markus: As an actor and improviser in Chicago, it was a natural progression to get behind the camera and start creating content. For me, filmmaking is an extension of acting, and all under the umbrella of storytelling.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP?
Markus: Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?It’s a short comedy poking fun at a Denver couple who have no idea what they’re doing in the mountains. Logline: Ill-prepared for the mountains, Trevor & Janelle realize they’ve brought the wrong map, are lost, and have dwindling food rations.

Q: What else are you working on?
Markus: Currently working on a handful of short films and pushing towards a first feature film.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?

Markus: This short was completely improvised by the fabulous Wolfgang Stein & Stephanie Jones. I had a loose outline: This is the moment you realize you’re lost. Now what? My wonderful wife Brittany Markus and I were behind the camera and Spencer Nelson ran audio. Once we got set, we essentially said to Wolf and Stephanie, “Ok, go.”  They then did what they do best! You can, and should, go see Stephaine in Barkley & Makeshift Shakespeare at https://voodoocomedy.com/ You can catch Wolf around town often at Voodoo as well.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?https://www.joywreck.com
https://www.instagram.com/joywreck/
https://twitter.com/JOYWRECK
https://www.facebook.com/JOYWRECK/
https://vimeo.com/joywreck
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5KwogcO__gBK2b5fAm_PTg

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
Markus: Thank you so much for having us. It is great to have a place like The Emerging Filmmakers Project for us filmmakers to show our work.