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Meet the Filmmakers: Brad Stabio & Kirk Anderson, “50”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
BS & KA: As Brad was walking one day from Achmore to Duirinish, he happened upon a mysterious lake that seemed to move from place to place. As he tried to go around it, an enchantress named Viviane rose up out of the lake holding a Bolex H-16 EL. She gave the camera to Brad and told him that he was destined to become a great filmmaker. When he got home, he misplaced the Bolex and forgot about it completely. Years later he went to film school at CU in order to meet girls.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
BS & KA: This was our entry into the 2016 48 Hour Film Challenge for Denver. It was one of our most ambitious shoots. It didn’t win much, but we love it and are proud of it.

Q: What else are you working on?
BS & KA: Everyone in the group is working on professional projects right now. Brad is finishing a documentary about the Colorado Ballet. As a group, we’re preparing for a sequel to our film Ba Naché dol Fonn Baeo. A foreign film in a made-up language.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
BS & KA: The letter “e” doesn’t appear in any of our scripts. We use word with “e” all the time, but our printer doesn’t print them, so we have to replace theme with 3s.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
BS & KA: Stabio Productions’ Vimeo Page: https://vimeo.com/stabio

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
BS & KA: We love that there are venues to allow filmmakers to make films (48 Hour Film Project) and to show them (EFP).

50 will screen during the48Hr Film Project Takes Over The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, July 18th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Quinn McCain, “More Than Just Friends”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
QM: I became a film make to tell stories that are to important just for words. One of my teachers told me “A photo is worth a thousand words, your films are worth one million.”

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
QM: We are planning on the film going to more film festivals so the EFP is a jumping off point.

Q: What else are you working on?
QM: I am working on a feature film with ASL Blackwing and Martin is in Sweden where he is finishing up his high schooling

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
QM: We are all high school students.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
QM: on Vimeo at https://vimeo.com/user50002912
And Martins Vimeo at https://vimeo.com/martinekelund

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
QM: I think it is a great way to show work that in many cases would not be shown in the way it deserves.

More Than Just Friends will screen during the48Hr Film Project Takes Over The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, July 18th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmakers: Anita Schutte & Donald Rae, “Blameless”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
A&D: Film is a form of storytelling that lasts forever and has a wide reach, theatre, where the majority of us originated is finite, and we wanted to explore those story telling possibilities.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
A&D: Blameless, was Ruff, Ruff, Dog’s second attempt at a 48 hour film and our first silent piece.

It screened at the 48 hour film best of 2016 and won best use of line of dialogue.

Q: What else are you working on?
A&D: Currently gearing up for what will be our 9th film competition (5 Denver 48’s, 1 London 48, 2 Fourpoints, 1 Flicks 4 Chicks Film Festival), and finishing production on the pilot for our webseries-Susy McPhail-Adventures in Real Estate.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
A&D: Not weird really, but since we do most of the filming in our home, Fred the dog, appears purposely and not so purposely in a lot of our work. He tends to sneak into frame like the ninja dog he is.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
A&D: https://www.facebook.com/Ruff-Ruff-Dog-Films-321158691987930/?modal=admin_todo_tour

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
A&D: I love that Denver has this platform for local indie film makers.

Blameless will screen during the48Hr Film Project Takes Over The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, July 18th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Annanya “Andy” George, “1000 Bad Films”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
AG: I started out as a professional magician, I would film YouTube videos every weekend with my best friend at the time, I would then get home and cut them into tiny 10-15- minute videos. Over time, I grew to love the film medium and, what I could achieve through cutting more than the magic. So, I ditched the cards and made a movie. It wasn’t good, but that’s when I think I started becoming a filmmaker. Now, looking back at it, I realize that its mostly because I felt like I had something to say, but magic wouldn’t let me do that, Movies do. It’s easier to show people what I’m feeling or thinking than it is to tell them.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your
plans for it?
AG: You’d be watching my student documentary, 1000 Bad Films, in many ways it’s my first official documentary. This was made back when I was still trying to find my visual voice. The one thing that has carried over is my affintiy for humor through cuts. The film has been screened at an online film festival called the “Hollywood Verge Film Awards” and it’s screened at Century theatre in Boulder, as a part of a student film gathering organized by some friends who work there. I have no plans for it. It’s probably going to be an extra feature on a DVD or Blu-ray of a movie I make in the future.

Q: What else are you working on?
AG: Quite a lot actually, I’m currently in the process of writing my short film, Schadenfreude, which is about how massive death is to us as a concept, but in reality, it’s not at all as massive and gripping as one might think. This would probably be expanded into a feature, then there’s “Un-Indian Indian”, a semi-autobiographical film about being Indian but not accepted by the Indian community outside, or even, inside of India. Then, I’m in the process of writing 3-4 features that I’m going to keep on the back burner, not announcing them yet. I’m in Post for my second documentary “Open Mic”, which is about the underground Stand up comedy community in Boulder, CO. We’re shooting a TV pilot in early July – late August of a show called Legacy. This show was the reason I started a YouTube channel in the first place. And Finally, one of my best friends and I are finishing the final draft of a musical we wrote together, called The Millennial Paradox. He did the music.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
AG: Weird thing about me is that I’m a scatterbrained talker/thinker. So, if I’m super excited, say goodbye to my sentences making sense to you. Most often (not in the film you’ll see at EFP), my movie’s thesis statement or introduction to who our protagonist is as a person, comes in the opening scene before the title.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
AG: My website www.annanyageorge.com is a good place to start, there’s the usual Instagram @annanyageorge and a Youtube channel that I would link here but I’m in the process of starting a new one, hopefully It’d be up by the time this post goes up, the link to my youtube would be on my Website and that link will get updated the day the new channel is up.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
AG: Thank you. I never thought that my movie (any of them) would be screened at a legitimate, respected theatre. It’s awesome to see you guys do this and I wish there was a ton more of you guys out there so that broke, hungry, film people like myself, can actually take pride in their work again. I hope to come back with a better film (if that’s an option) and thank you times a thousand.

1000 Bad Films will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, June 20th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Rion Smith, “Kutkh”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
RS: To tell stories and build worlds.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
RS: Kutkh – an old Norse Raven God arises after being summoned!

Q: What else are you working on?
RS: Building a whole monster world.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
RS: I can speak Mayan – product of the peace corps, and usually use some of it in my movies.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
RS: Youtube.com/creepytvchannel

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
RS: You guys kick ass!!!

Kutkh will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, June 20th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Grant Worden, “Poetic Burden”

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Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
GW: I am attempting to become a writer/director/producer (filmmaker) in order to have the freedom, knowledge, and power to create a story. I would like to create journeys, characters, and worlds that people can wake up and run around in. Film/video is a powerful tool, I have only scratched the surface on how to use it in my own upside-down-backward-sort-of way. I enjoy the team aspect of the film industry and will continue to write and direct passionate stories.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
GW: Poetic Burden is a Ghimself Productions and Burning Script Pictures 2018 Denver 48-Hour Film Project submission. Our entire film was written, shot, edited in 48-hours (Friday evening -Sunday afternoon). This sleepless weekend challenges your team’s drive as filmmakers, yet also empowers your team to create. Poetic Burden, follows a crippled sheriff’s code when he learns his daughter is being held, hostage.

With this family-like cast of Eric Tausch, Dalena Nguyen, Matt Fellers, Julia Winstead, and a multi-talented crew, I am proud to call “Poetic Burden” my Victor, Colorado Western.

2018 48-Hour Film Project Parameters:

  • Randomly Selected Genre – “Western”
  • Prop – “a stuffed wallet”
  • Line of Dialogue – “Stop copying me”
  • Main Character’s name – “Ruby or Rubin Starr”

Q: What else are you working on?
GW: I currently work as a Production Assistant and 1st AD in the commercial, narrative, and documentary film industry here in Denver. I am fortunate enough to work here in Colorado and all over the United States. Between those jobs, I am writing and rewriting original feature and television screenplays. Beyond commercial client projects and wedding videography, this Summer marks our team’s 4th 48-Hour Film Project year. It will be fun to “up the production value” this year and continue to create.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
GW: Not weird, but the best part of the production… filming in the mountain town of Victor, Colorado. It was a wonderful traveling experience due to the filming location, The (run-down and abandoned) Black Monarch Hotel run by Timber Smalls. The old historic hotel has since been remodeled!!! CHECK IT OUT!!!

Our August filming date helped us lock down this amazing, creepy, and dated location. The “Western” feel would not have come through without Timber Smalls and that abandoned hotel. The locals of Victor were friendly and accommodating. There were multiple helping hands who just wanted to be involved and understand the process. I have known a film set to bring people together quickly and our time in Victor, CO was unforgettable. Thank you to everyone who was involved.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
GW: Thank you for the follow / clicking around. Feel free to reach out and connect, collaboration is key!

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
GW: The Emerging Filmmakers Project has been a great supporter of my work as well as fellow filmmakers, colleagues, and creatives, it is my “home theatre.”
I cannot explain how much I appreciate participating in the monthly EFP event. The Bug Theatre, in general, is a hub of comedy and drama works. One of my favorite aspects of the EFP is, the evening invites filmmakers to share their work, behind the scenes stories, camera suggestions, production secrets, as well as offers a chance to reflect on the writing/character process. Cheers to more to come!

Poetic Burden will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, June 20th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Matt Struck, “The Sketch Gen 9000”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
MS: I was given a video camera when I was 13 years old and I infatuated with making films. Me and my friends would get together and just make fun short movies. It wasn’t until my late 20s that I started making them seriously and in recent years I have realized I loved being able to tell stories.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
MS: I will be screening a sketch called The Sketch Gen 9000. The sketch will live in a full episode (22 minutes) of the show Really Late Night with Matt Struck. It’s a comedy show that weaves sketch comedy and narratives together. It has not been screened anywhere before so this will be the first time the public can see it.

Q: What else are you working on?
MS: I am working full time on Really Late Night with Matt Struck, a comedy show about a tv host who has a late night show public access television. Matt’s personal life falls apart because alcohol and substance abuse but he is determined to keep the show going.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
MS: While I was working at a movie theater I once sold a hot dog to Alicia Keys.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
MS: To find out more about me visit reallylatenight.com or check out my instagram @mattstrucktures

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
MS: I love that Denver has such a vibrant and supportive community thanks the EFP!

The Sketch Gen 9000 will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, June 20th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Angelo Guglielmo, “The Monolith”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
AG: I was born as the eleventh child in a family of eleven. A big Italian family with a full cast of whacky characters–it was like growing up in a Fellini movie.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
AG: My film The Monolith is a doc short about my next door neighbor here in Manhattan. The idea for the film came over morning coffee visits. While she was telling me about this major loss of her view, I could see the visuals: an artist, the skyline view, a building. The film has been popular on Vimeo, screened around the world in festivals and won a few awards, too!

Q: What else are you working on?
AG: I’m currently filming a doc about a survivor from the Century 16 Shooting. It has been pretty intense with a lot of twists and turns. I’ve adapted my book and documentary The Woman Who Wasn’t There into a screenplay and shopping it.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
AG: Let’s see: currently, I’m listening to that Justin Bieber song “I Don’t Care” on repeat. I am a huge Streisand fan and have a project I need to post called “Let go and Let Barbra.”

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
AG: www.vimeo.com/AngeloG/themonolith and directedbyangelo on Instagram.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
AG: I’m honored to be screening here and hope the audience is tough on my film.

The Monolith will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, May 16th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Jon Casler, “Paul Rivaz Gets Back Up”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
JC: I was taking a game development class in 2011 where we made animations with the video game engines. It was by far my favorite class, so I resolved to go to film school in the future to learn how to make ‘real’ live action movies. 5 years later, I’m still making movies!

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
JC: This film has never had a public screening. It was my documentary production project for Colorado film school for the fall 2015 semester. I knew I wanted to do a film about a comedian, because I love comedy and comedy shows. Fortunately, Paul Rivaz, who I had met only a few months before, agreed to do it, though he told me he thought his life was boring and nothing was going to happen. Then, during the course of the filming, his acting mentor Mike Nuccio died, and he landed a job in Africa, and was preparing to make that move, in addition to trying to survive at the low paying job he held at the time. I filmed so much material it was very overwhelming to try to cut it down to 8 minutes for the class. I also wasn’t very skilled at screenwriting back then, so I wasn’t satisfied with my class cut. I kept working on the film off and on for about another year. I finished a second cut, and a few months later the hard drive it was stored on got corrupted. Fortunately, I uploaded a copy to youtube in case this happened. Unfortunately, I still wasn’t happy with the cut. Because it was an interim cut, there’s some jumpy edits that are now unfortunately baked into the film forever. I may film the Q and A and add it to the film, because Paul’s life has gotten a lot better since 2015, and it would make for a perfect happy ending. Because the footage was destroyed, I don’t have any more plans for screenings in the future, except for Paul’s wedding, if that ever happens.

Q: What else are you working on?
JC: I’m working on writing and producing my own shorts, webseries, and documentaries. I am also figuring out how to backup all of my professional footage that remains, which is about 20 TB! Right now, I am deciding between a FreeNAS RAID server, LTO tape, or archival Blu-Ray. I have an upcoming project about a man in Utah who rescues, hunts, and keeps Mink as pets. I want to use Paul and some people I met in acting class in an upcoming bromance short. I’m a big proponent of the American Film Market, so I’m also creating a concept for a feature to make and sell there.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
JC: This movie was the first time I was part of the crew that captured the last professional footage of someone who died soon after. It’s happened again twice more.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
JC: Paul helped to build me a website, HeadlinerMedia.com, though I never update it. After this screening, I resolve to get it updated!

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
JC: It’s important for filmmakers to support each other in Denver because there’s not a broad consensus in the general population of the value of film production in this state. They like watching it, but not funding or helping it’s creation, which is a real shame, because Colorado has so much to offer for film here. So we just have to do the best we can through projects like the EFP, which do get seen by national industry people. In fact, one of the Walking Dead crew told me that I should focus on getting a film into the EFP, he was very impressed by what he saw.

Paul Rivaz Gets Back Up will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, May 16th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Richard Corso, “The New World Order”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
RC: To add my own words to the famous Kubrick quote: making a film is hard. Plain and simple. But in my line of work there is no greater thrill in life than seeing the characters you created come to life on screen. Telling stories, in my opinion is what makes us human. Continuing the story is what storytellers do. Who we are and what we create is nothing more than matter. In time, the film we shoot on, the paintings we paint, the pyramids we build, will eventually go back into the ground of a rock that is floating in space. And as sad as that is, it truly is a nice little thought that for a small point in an infinite time, we had the pleasure to add to the mound of future dirt, for some species to find millions of years from now.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
RC: The film screening at EFP is The New World Order, a film adaptation of Harold Pinter’s political satire of the same title. This dark comedy stars Cody Dermon & Haydn Winston as two Englishmen with unknown goals of fascistic tendencies who discuss in bullish tones what they intend to do to a third man, who sits gagged, blindfolded and bound to a chair. The acts of violence and abuse referred to are present in the speech rather than the action but an oppressive air of menace persists.

Q: What else are you working on?
RC: I am currently in post-production of a film, titled Cassidy Blues. A collaboration between Kareem Kamahl-Taylor and myself. Cassidy Blues draws inspirations from 60’s French New Wave as well as high-octane American Cop dramas of the 70’s. The story follows two detectives (played by Gabe Combs & Brian McGee) who are chasing a ‘Bonnie & Clyde’ criminal couple (played by Mandy Groves & Asha Bee) their only lead: a pack of cigarettes known as Cassidy Blues.

I am also in pre-production of a surreal adventure comedy, titled Three, to Cairo. The epilogue to a Hollywood epic, Three to Cairo is an absurdist exploration of communication – not only why it fails and where that failure leads, but also the strange and quirky universals that bring people together – games, ambition, travel, and literal and figurative thirst. By showing its diverse characters on a simple path to a common destination, Three, to Cairo dives into the intricacies of that basic human need: connection.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
RC: Website: www.richardcorsofilm.com
Vimeo: vimeo.com/richardcorso
Facebook: www.facebook.com/richardcorso.film
Instagram: www.instagram.com/richiethereptilianplant

The New World Order will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, May 16th at The Bug Theatre.