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Meet the Filmmaker: Michael Bliss, “Clown”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
MB: On my 16th birthday I wrote in my journal that I want to be a Filmmaker and Director. Through the years I have made that dream a reality by working with ABC, FOX, ESPN, and working on many films and Documentaries. I have also worked for and with great directors like Robert Rodriquez, Richard Linklater and Quentin Tarantino. Currently I am creating live television shows at DOM and working for imADgine Studios.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
MB: Clown is a film I shot in Austin on Super 8 Film. It was for a film festival similar to the 48 Hour Film Project. They gave us a soundtrack and you had to shoot on Super 8 Film with that soundtrack. It was one of the best in fest films.

Q: What else are you working on?
MB: Blissfest333
A multimedia, Cultural Arts, Film Festival
We are creating unity in our commUNITY, bringing love, peace, harmony and bliss to a festival about creativity and individuality.

I also have many films I am currently working on. Here is a couple of them.
“The Troll” This is a story about a troll that gets lost in the city.
ZombieFest II “Sloppy Seconds” The Dead are Alive

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
MB: The number 333 keeps coming up in my life. In one of my first films The Asylum 3:33pm pops up for one minute. It was an accident that we hit the button for the time to pop up on the screen and now its time stamped on that film forever.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
MB: www.blissfest333.org

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
MB: We love Patrick Sheridan and everybody involved with EFP. So grateful to have a venue like The Bug and all the wonderful people that help run EFP and all the Film Festivals held there. Thank you so much for supporting our film and art commUNITY.

Clown will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, March 16th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Carlos Daniel Flores, “I Stand Still: a love poem”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
CF: Filmmaking is one of those things I somewhat inadvertently stumbled upon when I was younger. I already had a passion for music, writing, art and photography, and film just beautifully puts all of those together. I love the technical challenge, the endless possibilities for telling the human story, and just about everything about the process.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
CF: I Stand Still is a freeform exploration of the love between two women and the challenges arising from the protagonist’s fears. It premiered at the Southern Colorado Film Festival in Alamosa. This is the second in a series of short cinematic poems, conceived mostly to hone our skills, open up our creative process with a more improvisational flow, and meeting new talented people in the Denver area. The production process for this one was unique in that, while most of the shots were planned in detail, the argument between the lovers that becomes the focus of the story was entirely improvised on the spot.

Q: What else are you working on?
CF: I am currently entering production for an exciting short poem, Con tus manos, which will feature a dance between two men, and refining a feature length screenplay to be produced here in Denver!

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
CF: I’ll watch almost anything with the subtitles on… I hate missing things!

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
CF: For general updates, www.facebook.com/watcheyestudios
For new movies, www.vimeo.com/watcheyestudios
And for artwork, www.1-carlos-flores.pixels.com

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
CF: This is my second time at the EFP. Last time was a lot of fun, can’t wait to see the other projects and meet some more cool peoplez!

I Stand Still: a love poem will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, March 16th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Bradley Haag, “365 Day Video Project – 2016”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
BH: It seemed like a good idea at the time.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
BH: You’re going to see 365 2-second video clips from each day of my year in 2016. So far, it can only be seen online and I plan to continue this project through 2017.

Q: What else are you working on?
BH: How much time do you have? While I’m trying to get all my films turned into blu-rays with cool special features, I’m also producing my weekly podcast (Reel Nerds Podcast) and writing the second season of the companion web-series and hoping to lens it over the summer,

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
BH: One weird thing is that we have to perform a human sacrifice before and after each production.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
BH: Nebulusvisions.com mostly has everything I do on it, but if you wanna follow me like a friggin’ stalker, you can keep up via my instagram @nebulusvisions.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
BH: Thank you for accepting experimental video and giving it a platform among traditional films. I hope EFP can help encourage filmmakers to branch out and play with the unconventional.

365 Day Video Project – 2016 will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, March 16th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: D.K. Johnston, “Father of Lies”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
DK: I got into filmmaking when I was young, but really took it on full time in high school. I enjoyed taking short stores and turning them into film-ready scripts. I produced my first short with a buddy of mine Mike Collier, who is actually the DP for Father of Lies, and we just took off from there. I’ve always enjoyed the process of telling a god story whether it was on paper or on the screen. Developing new characters, and in some cases, new worlds to explore. I have become more of a project manager and facilitator for various projects ranging from comedies and dramas to commercials and documentaries. As long as I’m on set I’m a happy guy.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
DK: We are screening a film I produced in 2015 called Father of Lies, which is one in a 5 part series of shorts directed by Levi A. Taylor. Through this short we learn about a young boy named Jack Ryder and his family. In this story we find Jack on a camping trip with this father Billy Ray, and learn a little of about a very memorable experience Billy Ray had when he was a Preacher. All of the tales in these short films are slightly fictionalize stories from the director’s childhood. While sometimes disturbing, these stories helped shape the man he is today.

Q: What else are you working on?
DK: Currently I’m producing a Colorado-based feature comedy shot in the Denver/Boulder area. We have an Indiegogo campaign running right now raising funds to put the finishing touches on post-production, and an eventual release to either film festival or distribution. Maybe a combination of both. You can find out more at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/army-coop-feature-comedy-post-production/x/5485433#/

I’m also collaborating with a new production service company called Ironsmith Films based at The Lot. Currently directing commercial and corporate productions.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
DK: When ever I am producing a film or commercial I typically become the set’s First Assistant Director at the same time. As a fun tradition I carry a lightsaber hilt on my belt. Makes it easy to find me in the crowd.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
DK: You can visit the following websites to see work I’m currently working on.
www.trisevenpictures.com
www.crookedpictures.com
www.goironsmith.com

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
DK: I’m very excited to be included in the EFPlooza this year, and look forward to seeing all the great films that were programmed this year. EFP has been a great way to network with like minded individual who share my passion for storytelling. I’m sure it will continue to be so for many years.

Father of Lies will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, March 16th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmakers: Bruce Tetsuya and Anders Minor, “Short Term”

“Short Term”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?

BT: I’ve always had a fascination with movies, both watching and creating. The medium of motion picture is the ultimate form of expression and storytelling. There’s something about the journey one makes when creating a film that excites me. I feel as if I only exist when I’m working on a film. Every aspect of the process (writing, producing, directing, filming, editing, etc.) is rewarding, exhilarating, and addicting. My hunger for film is insatiable.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?

BT: Short Term was my first short film. It came from a script I’d written a few years back, so we decided dust it off, and produce it as practice; to make good use of our summer. Visually, I tried my best to emulate Fincher’s style, even though the style I’d usually take inspiration from is more similar to Iñárritu. Our wonderful lead, Mary Jenifer Mitchell, suggested we enter it to the EFP! It hasn’t been screened anywhere else, and my plans for it will probably not continue past this event!

Q: What else are you working on?

BT: My second short film, Counter Clockwise, recently won the CU Boulder Grillo Award for best film. I’m currently writing my third short film, while producing and doing cinematography for a friend’s new project. My team and I will be creating new short films every two months (at least) for the foreseeable future.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?

BT: My favorite aspect of any film is character. If the story sucks but the characters are good, there is still hope for an interesting film. If the story is great but the characters suck, what’s the point in following the story? Story is widely hailed as king, but it’s important to remember that the narrative should come from the characters, and not use the characters to serve the story. My favorite technical aspect of filmmaking is the motivated “long take”. It creates the very sense of immersion and intensity that I love about films. Some of my favorite films include No Country for Old Men, Her, Inglorious Basterds, Frances Ha, Breathe, Children of Men, Victoria, and Birdman. These films either incorporate the “long take” well, or have fantastic characters.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?

BT: My company’s website is www.definitionindigoproductions.com – all our upcoming projects and events can be found there. You can also find us on Vimeo, either under Bruce Tetsuya, or Definition Indigo.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?

BT: I’m so glad we found this organization, thank you from all of us at Definition Indigo for featuring our film!

“Short Term” screens at the February 2017 Emerging Filmmakers Project.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Bryan Harrold, Thomas Jaeger, Wes Matheny, “Slappy H.R.”

“Slappy H.R.”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?

TJ: It takes a certain kind of person to be in any creative industry. We’re just crazy enough to choose the making of motion pictures.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?

TJ: Slappy HR will be making its long coming debut at EFP Feb 2017. In 2015, 7andCO Productions was given the AJA Cion for review, and shot several things over the course of two weeks with the camera.  Slappy HR was one of them.  The script was written in a matter a days, and we were off. We have no current plans for Slappy

Q: What else are you working on?

TJ: We are currently working on several projects right now, including finishing up Post Production on a feature length documentary about the expansion of Lacrosse to the West and into more urban settings. We are also working on a short film that will be directed by local Sheryl Glubok; this film, Lily ‘N’ Rose  will be shot this summer with more info coming soon.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?

TJ: Most of our films have a hidden old headshot of 7andCO’s lead producer, Thomas Jaeger

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?

TJ: Website Facebook

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?

TJ: We at 7andCO are all glad to have an outlet for independent films on a monthly basis.  I believe the independent trend/art/industry will grow more and more, and I’m willing to bet that EFP will be a staple for a long time to come.

Slappy H.R.” screens at the February 2017 Emerging Filmmakers Project.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Kyle Homan, “”D”UI” & “Tuesdays at 8”

“D”UI” & Tuesdays at 8″

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?

KH: To bring to life the ideas, characters, and stories I have in my head and to see them play out as reality.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?

KH: “D”UI was a short film I made 3 years ago in my senior year of high school, and Tuesdays at 8 was my second project of my first year at the Colorado Film School. Neither of them have screened publicly, but they are available to view on YouTube.

Q: What else are you working on?

KH: Right now, I am working on my 2nd year production for the Colorado Film School, a comedic short about a hit-woman who is only assigned to kill really old people.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?

KH: Check out my YouTube channel at bit.do/kylehomanfilms!

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?

KH: What you guys are doing is super awesome and I always look forward to showing my work at The Bug! Thank you thank you thank you!

“D”UI” & Tuesdays at 8” screen at the February 2017 Emerging Filmmakers Project.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Nancy Fingerhood, “Muff Mints”

“Muff Mints”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?

NF: I enjoy telling stories and seeing them come to life.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?

NF: Muff Mints, a spoof commercial.  It has not been screened before.

Q: What else are you working on?

NF: I just wrapped episode four of my web series Mile High Nancy

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?

NF: I think there’s a lot of weird things about my films.  I try to capture the perspective of middle aged women.  Sometimes my stuff can offend some people and some of it is definitely not for children.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?

NF: On my YouTube channel Mile High Nancy and my WordPress blog confessions of a middle aged woman gone wild.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?

NF: I’m glad filmmakers have the chance to show their work and share ideas and tips to improve.

Muff Mints” screens at the February 2017 Emerging Filmmakers Project.