0

Meet the Filmmaker: Henry Jarvis, “Artery & Vain”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
HJ: I can’t remember the why exactly as it’s been over a decade since I decided to do this, but I keep doing it because I like the feeling of being on set. It has a family kind of vibe to it and it makes it a little bit less exhausting. It’s also the only thing I’m kind of good at so I am kind of stuck in this horrible job field.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
HJ: “Artery & Vain” is my freshman film at the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan. It hasn’t screened anywhere majorly, just small and private screenings in New York. I submitted it to a couple different film festivals but don’t have high hopes for the outcome. Most likely it will be accepted no where and eventually be put online where if I’m lucky 50 people will watch it.

Q: What else are you working on?
HJ: My next film that I’m directing is called “Fabrication”. It’s a film about schizophrenia and paranoia, because its essentially a requirement for millennial filmmakers to do something with these subject matters. But the film is starring only Muppets. So that’s cool. That film will hopefully be done around December.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
HJ: Artery & Vain was shot over the course of five hours. We rented a hotel room in Chelsea and that pretty much drained all of our budget. So we only had the one night and had to get all of it without the need of reshoots. It was very stressful. We had to use a skeleton crew so that we had room for everyone. The sound department essentially made the shower their room of operation. Also, most of the crew speaks English as their second language. The DP, AD, and AC are all from China originally and they all did an amazing job, and the film wouldn’t be the same without them. Proving that the Chinese are ten times more talented than American filmmakers.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
HJ: Creative Hell Entertainment is my production company. I don’t have a website, but my Vimeo and Youtube have all my films. Beyond that, Dark_Americana is my Instagram and you can see most of my updates as well as other films I work on there.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
HJ: It’s a fun time. It’s a good place to screen your films and see an audience reaction beyond likes on Facebook. And that’s always nice.

Artery & Vain will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, August 17th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Kyle Pavelis, “Brother 1 & 2”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
KJ: I became a filmmaker because I have loved watching movies from a very young age. I have been creating movies ever since on a very low budget.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
KJ: The audience will be watching “Brother,” a short drama film that I made with my sister and my friend. It was selected for the Douglas County School District Film Festival. I hope that it is well received and is a movie that everybody will enjoy.

Q: What else are you working on?
KJ: I am working on getting new movie gear and equipment to improve my short films to their maximum potential.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
KJ: A weird thing that most people won’t realize while watching my short films, is that all of them have been filmed using an iPhone or Samsung Galaxy. Also, most of my films are written, shot, and edited in less than three days.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
KJ: My YouTube channel is the best way to stay tuned for my upcoming short films. The name of the channel is “KPav Films.”

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
KJ: I am greatly appreciative of the opportunity to show my work at The Emerging Filmmakers Project. I am excited to hear what I can improve on for upcoming projects.

Brother 1 & 2 will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, August 17th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Bradley Haag, “Battlerap Galactica”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
BH: It was the easiest way to disappoint my parents at the time.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
BH: You’re going to see a couple of films but only one with a rap battle duo from another planet. It has only screened at the Bug before and I planned to use it to take over the world but I’m not getting very far with that… yet.

Q: What else are you working on?
BH: I just finished another 48 Hour Film that you missed screening because you’re probably reading this after Sunday. If you’re lucky, it’ll screen at the Esquire in September but then you’ll still have to pay for that privilege.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
BH: Does it have to be true? I was born without bones.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
BH: To Hell! Or nebulusvisions.com

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
BH: Yeah, why are you doing this to people? They don’t deserve to be treated like this. I’m thankful you provide a platform for local emerging filmmakers to share their work and get feedback from strangers but subjecting them to Battlerap Galactica is just mean!

Battlerap Galactica will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, August 17th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Michael T. Scott, “Gregory Goat: Angry M.D.”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
MS: Why does anyone? To meet gaffers.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
MS: Gregory Goat: Angry M.D.: A doctor with no patience for his patients. It’s only screened in anger management support groups, but never to an audience lacking rage issues.

Q: What else are you working on?
MS: Events! On Oct. 13th at Mutiny Information Cafe we’ll be screening The Dumbest Shit I Ever Saw, a FREE animation anti-festival featuring some of the baddest, dumbest, sickest, and nonsensical animated shorts… Also, Nov. 11th at GRACe (Global Riverfront Art Center) we’re starting an event for the art community called Take Art/Leave Art (TALA). It’ll be part of a tri-event with DINK’s Colorado Showcase 2 and Draw Off!

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
MS: When I write a script I steer clear of multi-syllable words.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
MS: Just come up to me and ask. I’m very approachable and will direct you to where you can find more of my material as well as inform on your top 6 lucky numbers for the day.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
MS: Thanks for looking past my criminal record and allowing my work to be shown!

Gregory Goat: Angry M.D. will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, August 17th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Hector Quijano, “Continuum”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
HQ: I became a filmmaker to create and explore worlds which are virtually confined within our imagination. As spectators or illusionists, we have the imagination to believe in something more [allegorical] than our own reality.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
HQ: ​Continuum is a sci-fi, crime which was made with the intention of creating a [paradox] using only one actor but multiple characters. It was also an official selection and Special Jury Award Winner of the Frostbite International Film Festival in April 2017.

Q: What else are you working on?
HQ: I am currently in the post-production stage of a short psychological film called “REM”, which I also wrote and directed.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
HQ: SPOILER: Most of the time I tend to kill off my lead characters, but still keep them alive through some kind of metaphysical mysticism created by the narrative universe they inhabit.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
HQ: www.vimeo.com/hectorquijano

hqcinematics.wix.com/hectorquijano

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
HQ: Thank you to the Emerging Filmmakers Project for exposing filmmakers, not only to general audiences, but to other filmmakers and artists alike. Networking is one of the most important elements of indie filmmaking.

Continuum will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, August 17th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Raoul Vehill, “3 Way Furry Love Suicide”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
RV: I think I made a few movies before I knew I was one.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
RV: 3 Way Furry Love Suicide. I was learning the workflow of making a smartphone movie.

Q: What else are you working on?
RV: Ruffy in the Shopping Plaza of the Dead. It’s about the same character. I was going to throw the puppet star out but saw him in the dumpster and had an idea.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
RV: No cats were harmed in the production of the movie. That and I’ve seen none of the Planet of the Apes reboots.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
RV: I’ll update daygloflix.org soon.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
RV: Thanks for all you do!!!!!!!!!

3 Way Furry Love Suicide will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, July 20th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Michael Lindenberger, “Falling in Love”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
ML: I was influenced by my wife, Nancy and simply wanted to try it myself.
Q: What are we going to see at the EFP?  Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
ML: Falling in Love – a short comedy about the stages of a relationship.  But, in a warped kind of way!  This has not screened elsewhere and I have no specific plans for it.
Q: What else are you working on?
ML: Currently shooting a feature and am collaborating with my wife on two more short comedies, one about old man balls and the other is about wedding vows.
Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
ML: At first I found myself drawn to this type of twisted humor but as time goes on, I am starting to enjoy the more serious and dramatic stories.
Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
ML: Linde Mike is my Youtube channel.
Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
ML: Thank you for the opportunity to show my video and thank you for showing your appreciation for this craft.
Falling in Love will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, July 20th at The Bug Theatre.
0

Meet the Filmmaker: Chris Freeman, “Girl Meets Germs”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
CF: Since I was a little kid, I’ve always been obsessed with movies; often watching the entertaining ones over and over. I’ve also always been equally fascinated with the process of making movies; I was that kid who actually watched all the special features on a DVD/Blu Ray. I have always seen film as art, which is probably why I feel I get so much out of it as a viewer and creator. Film has always been my one passion, and I woke up one day a few years ago and said, now is the time. My wife, Rachel Freeman, also loves film and decided she was up for becoming a film editor on these movies we make together.
Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
CF: Girl Meets Germs is the first film I ever shot/directed. It is a romantic comedy about a germaphobic college girl who just wants to study in peace at the local library, but becomes distracted when a boisterous, sloppy college boy sits at her table. Romantic Comedy isn’t the genre I’m typically attracted to as a storyteller, so I wanted to make it different by having it be 99% dialogue-free. It has been selected into four film festivals so far, including several in Colorado: the Lyons Film Festival, Intendence Film Festival, and the upcoming Blissfest333 International Film Festival on August 5th and 6th. After we wrap up the summer leg of the Colorado festival tour, we will perhaps submit it to some out-of-state festivals.
Q: What else are you working on?
CF: Our next short film, Speed Trap, is shooting in September, with a hopeful 2018 release date. It is a thriller and couldn’t be further from the genre of Girl Meets Germs. Audiences will get to see Girl Meets Germs‘ lead actor Mikaela Mae Hofbauer play around with a different role and genre. Fun fact: Girl Meets Germs co-lead actor Connor W. Anderson (a veteran Colorado filmmaker) will be the Director of Photography on this upcoming shoot. I can’t say anything else about it at the moment, but this is the first time it has been mentioned in public; we haven’t even announced it on social media yet. I can say it will be our first outdoor shoot and will make epic use of Colorado scenery.
Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
CF: We have two chihuahuas: Lula Mae and Daisy Rey. Lula has made it into our first two short films, Girl Meets Germs and Mr. Fuffles. In Girl Meets Germs, she can be seen on the wall in an Andy Warhol-style print behind Mikaela as she wipes down the table. In Mr. Fuffles, she is again on the wall in the form of a Christmas card, wearing a Santa hat. It’s turned into a Where’s Waldo hunt for those paying attention. Poor Daisy has not been featured yet on screen, so maybe it’s her turn.
Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
CF: The EFP is a great resource for new and established filmmakers in Colorado. The chance to screen my film in front of a Denver crowd of film lovers is exciting. I am grateful for the opportunity, and thankful for the hard work the EFP crew puts into programming/screening the event each month. I am excited to attend future screenings as well!
Girl Meets Germs will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, July 20th at The Bug Theatre.
0

Meet the Filmmaker: Kaitlin McMullen, “Patrick Sheridan’s Purpose”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
KM: I have grown up with a camera by my side due to my parents documenting my every move. I got inspired by my family for filming the memories in a physical format with their cameras. I further on decided to learn how to film and edit videos together to create this type of visual art.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
KM: We will be seeing my documentary of Patrick Sheridan. The title of the film is Patrick Sheridan’s Purpose because I wanted to showcase his rhyme and reason for being on this planet.

Q: What else are you working on?
KM: I’ve been working on various short films, music video, and documentaries. Documentaries are definitely the genre of film that I am most passionate about.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
KM: A weird about me is that I can free style rap about any subject and every time I edit my films I have to be drinking chocolate milk to help me concentrate.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
KM: You can find more of my content on vimeo and instagram as Kaitlin McMullen.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
KM: I am so happy to be part of something so amazing. It brings me that filmmakers can come together, enjoy content, and inspire each other to be creative.

Patrick Sheridan’s Purpose will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, June 15th at The Bug Theatre.

0

Meet the Filmmaker: Dillon Cole, “Passenger’s Seat”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
DC: It makes me feel like a kid again. I get to play with fancy, expensive toys and play pretend with my friends.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
DC: PASSENGER’S SEAT was my team’s submission to the first Weekend Warriors Film Festival in Fort Collins, Colorado. It was made in 48 hours and won Best Supporting Actor, Best Original Score and Best Cinematography when it first screened in October 2016.

Q: What else are you working on?
DC: Filmmaking-wise, mostly commercial work. I’m the Cinema Manager at The Lyric, an independent cinema in Fort Collins, Colorado. We’re opening our new location in a few months, so I’ve been working on stuff for that. Friends & I premiered our newest short, A Lindbergh Baby Situation, earlier this month and I’m already itching for a new narrative project – holla atcha gurl if you have a neat script you want produced!

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
DC: I try my best to use “little movies” instead of “short films.” It sounds so cute!

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
DC: dillonjamescole.com. My phone number is on there too if you want to prank call me or ask me out for drinks.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
DC: I’m in endless appreciation for The EFP. To me, The EFP provides a crucial step for local filmmakers in their pursuit of larger success. Thank you for showing our little movie!

 Partners will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, June 15th at The Bug Theatre.