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Meet the Filmmakers: Lindsay Morrison and Michael La Breche, “Reliquary: A Mugging”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
Lindsay Morrison: I was always aiming toward having a career in the arts. First I thought jewelry design, then graphic design, but eventually I found my way to film, which ended up being a much better fit for me. Being able to bring the visions from my dreams to life is something I’ll never stop getting off on. As art mediums go, film is one of the most challenging, but I also find it the most satisfying, in large part because of the team work and synergy that takes place on set and in the editing room, and the magic that happens as a result. Taking that written word and those sloppy storyboards and making it come to life is the biggest thrill. I feel lucky everyday I get to be a filmmaker.
Michael La Breche: I’ve been infatuated with the role and power of the storyteller from the moment I discovered greek mythology and the King Arthur legends in 4th grade. After growing up on a steady diet of comic books, Godzilla, Star Trek, and Stephen King I knew I wanted to create my own worlds and characters, but it wasn’t until a friend showed me the Kevin Smith film ‘Clerks’ that I really started to consider film as a creative outlet. I love the different facets that go into filmmaking; the opportunity to blend mediums and stretch different creative muscles on every project. Seeing a character I helped shape come to life on screen is one of the most fulfilling things I’ve ever experienced and I plan to keep chasing that experience for as long as possible.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
A: The title is Reliquary: A Mugging – it’s a horror short, the first installment in an anthology series entitled Reliquary.” The first 5 episodes are written by Michael La Breche, and this first installment is directed by Lindsay Morrison

Q: What else are you working on?
A: We’ll be starting on the next installment of Reliquary” soon, as well as a few other digital shorts for our youtube channel. We’re in post on a documentary that we’ve been working on for a few years, and we have a horror feature in development which we’re aiming to get off the ground soon. We’re also in the process of building our business.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
Lindsay: I make a voice cameo in a lot of my movies. It’s become a bit of fun for me. I also love karaoke; are the two linked? I don’t know.
Michael: I have an unending, unapologetic love for the old Toho giant monster movies and still dream of someday making my own “guy in a suit stomping on miniatures” kaiju film.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
A: We have a youtube channel – if you go to youtube and search “Wolf Luv Films” we’ll pop up. We’d love it if everyone would subscribe! We also have a website: wolfluvfilms.com, and an instagram @wolfluvfilms

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
A: Our favorite thing about the EFP is the sense of community and creative energy it fosters. We’ve been really inspired seeing the passion and energy of the Denver film community and the Emerging Filmmakers Project is a vital part of that. We are so excited to be a part of it!

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Meet the Filmmakers: Grant Worden and Kyle Homan, “Open Mic Night”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
GW: Film kind of found me. I was the kid at the sleepover who was up last, finishing the movie. No matter the circumstances or number of times I’ve watched something, I have to see the end. Even last week, I stayed up way too late, just to make sure the ending of Braveheart hadn’t changed. When the film’s story and characters have that mesmerizing superpower, you cannot help but watch, relate and empathize. I love cinema due to the worlds they create, and I want to give my characters their own worlds.
KH: I’ve always loved telling stories, and in my opinion, film is the perfect way to tell a story. For the audience, it’s such an experiential piece of art that we as filmmakers get to play with, from conveying emotion through color to manipulating pacing and tone through editing. Make someone look badass with a low angle shot, bring a tear to someone’s eye with a swelling score. What drew me in as an audience member, the all-enveloping feeling you can get from watching a movie, is what keeps me making them.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
GW: Premiering publicly for the first time is Open Mic Night. This Colorado Film School 2018 production follows the ups and downs of a local bar’s last open mic night. Have a laugh, cry, or another round between the various patron’s performances. This love letter to dingy dive bars aims to sheds light on these smaller creative stages, and those pulled toward the open microphone.
KH: While we did get a chance to screen this film for cast and crew in the bar we filmed at, this is the first time we’re showing Open Mic Night to a public audience. We’re really hoping to get MC Manny’s story in front of as many eyes as we can, and to share the idea that you should always keep playing, regardless of who’s watching!

Q: What else are you working on?
GW: I have always enjoyed the question, “So, what’s next?” There are always a handful of creative projects in the pipeline. Writing-wise, I am dedicating 2019 to submitting original works to various writing competitions. I am also a writer/photographer/videographer for ondenver.com and aboutboulder.com. When I’m not writing, I work as a production assistant on local and out-of-state commercial, narrative, and documentary film sets. I am a freelancer for hire, fusing my advertising and film backgrounds together. My production company is also crowd funding for our next film production. More fun news to come!
KH: Grant and I are constantly mulling over potential upcoming projects. This year, we’re making a goal for ourselves to complete a 1-minute short film each month to explore different genres and shooting styles. Personally, I’m always working to build my brand, and to strengthen personal and professional relationships with the awesome filmmakers and videographers I get to work with at Lumenati Productions and Burning Script Pictures.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
GW: One of the major quirks of set was the egregious call times and shooting schedule. Working around the bar’s closed hours, our cast and crew shot at location from 3:00am to 3:00pm for three days in a row. To say the least, people were very tired and running on fumes. Finding the right time to schedule each camera “oner” proved difficult, but was actually our saving grace. We would set up the bar scene similar to a theatre production and get everyone involved and aware of their main action and/or background action. By the end of the first oner on day two, the cast and crew were all jazzed up, thanks to accomplishing such a difficult chunk of the day. By the end of the second oner on day three, the production heads knew the schedule was working to our advantage. Don’t get me wrong, there were plenty of speed bumps that came with filming during the middle of the night into morning, but the entire production was confined to one location, so our set community grew insanely quick. Wouldn’t have planned it any other way.
KH: Another difficulty with bringing Open Mic Night to life was the fact that we needed to film in a bar, and 4 out of 5 of our production heads were under 21. This made finding a location the biggest headache of the production, since it was extremely difficult to scout locations we couldn’t get into. When we finally secured a location, the signed paperwork wasn’t able to hold up our agreement, and we lost our first bar on Grant’s birthday, on my drive to spend Thanksgiving with my family. Luckily, the production recovered. On the hunt for a location, we wandered into a bar called Pearl’s, and almost immediately met the owner, James Bedwell, who was more than happy to work with us. Pearl’s ended up being the perfect location, and James ended up becoming one of our freelance clients!

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
GW: My full portfolio can be found at www.ghimselfproductions.com. Check out Open Mic Night behind the scenes at www.facebook.com/OMNshort2018. Follow me on Instagram @grantworden. Read my On Denver article about artist Taylor Herzog at www.ondenver.com/denver-creative-artist-taylor-herzog/. Thank you for viewing, critiquing, following, sharing, and purchasing my work. I enjoy being able to creatively collaborate with others. Bouncing ideas off the endless whiteboard is a sort of sport. My short film productions, photography, doodles, and overall creative world would not be possible without the support of others.
KH: Check out my personal website at www.khomproductions.com, or follow me on Instagram @kylethehoman. You can also find out more about the companies I work for at www.lumenati.co and www.bspdenver.com.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
GW: This is the third short film I have had the privilege to show here at The Bug Theatre and The Emerging Filmmakers Project. This community of filmmakers is deeply devoted to individual voice. Every time I attend or premiere at the EFP I am blown away by the talent in the surrounding seats. Inspiration finds me here. I appreciate the opportunity to discuss my productions and the magic behind the scenes. Thank you again for showing Open Mic Night. The EFP board of directors and supporting staff helps emerging creatives promote their work. I love the stage and Q&A. Thank you again. Thank you to the amazing cast and crew and a special thank you to James and Matt from Boogie Groove Entertainment at Your Mom’s House on 13th street.
KH: Coming to EFP is always an awesome chance to put your work in front of an audience and see if what you tried to do actually worked. Meeting the fellow creative minds of Denver is always inspiring, and reconnecting with familiar faces is always awesome. Thank you to the folks at EFP who put this together, and for uniting this community by bringing us all together.

Open Mic Night will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, December 17th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Guillermo Roqués, “El Javi – Recuerdo a Paco”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
GR: I have always been attracted to visual storytelling. I graduated in journalism and worked in several newspapers. After the 2008 crisis, I switched to video production and stayed there since then…

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
GR: Recuerdo a Paco is a music video of “El Javi”, a rock-flamenco band based in Denver.

It was produced in the first months of 2018.

Q: What else are you working on?
GR: I´m about to finish my first long feature documentary, called The Right to Rest, codirected with Sarah Megyesy. It explores the housing and homelessness crisis in Denver, along with the Tiny Home Village built as an emergency solution in RiNO.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
GR: I guess I´m as weird as any other human being.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
GR: You can find more about my next documentary at https://www.facebook.com/TheR2RFilm/

You can find more about El JAVI at https://eljavi.com

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
GR: I think it´s a great initiative and a good way to share work with other fellow filmmakers. Sharing is Caring!

El Javi – Recuerdo a Paco will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, December 17th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Antoine M. Dillard, “Captain Powerful”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
AD: I became a filmmaker because I wanted to tell stories. I wanted to make people, smile, laugh, feel, and be introduced to worlds and perspectives that they’ve never seen or thought about

Q: What else are you working on?
AD: I just wrapped post-production on Rise of the Avalanche: Revenge from the Shadows https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7327932/reference Currently producing a web series called Long Walks on the Beach https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8788606/reference & writing my first feature film Crazy Weapon 5: Back for the First Time https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8538244/reference

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
AD: You’re going to take a peek into the life of the world’s greatest superhero after he’s suffered a psychotic breakdown, hit rock bottom, and ended up in an insane asylum. It’s never been screen theatrically anywhere, so this will be its debut! Currently, no further plans for the film, although it’s still being considered for festivals taking place as early as February.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
AD: lol I’m not sure if it’s a weird thing or not but I try to put easter eggs in all of my films that reference other films I’ve done.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
AD: They can go to my production company website here: http://quantumvisualfx.com/

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
AD: I think The Emerging Filmmakers Project is excellent! There aren’t many outlets for independent filmmakers locally in general and I’m so happy an organization like this exists so that filmmakers have a platform express themselves through film. I’ve submitted here once before and everyone was just so nice and welcoming that I had to take another shot and submit again. I’ve been a few more times since submitting my last film and the Bug Theater is just a great place for the Emerging Filmmakers Project to take place.

Captain Powerful will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, December 17th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: William Briggs, “Silk” (teaser)

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
WB: We would visit my creative older cousins in the summers and we would make crazy kiddish films on super-8. We did super hero films, and Dungeons & Dragons, mad scientists. And then when VHS came out I wrote and directed our first talkie Dracula’s Daughter, as well as two 20 minute episodes of Doctor Who.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
WB: This is a 3-minute “teaser” for Silk a 30-minute short film noir in pre-production. It’s the debut and we’re going to post it to raise some funding for a real location shoot, etc.

Q: What else are you working on?
WB: Other than full steam ahead on Silk, I am writing a magic-fu action film next, hoping to do a little green-screen and wire-work, with other seed ideas already in the pipeline. Be gestation time is great.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
WB: Well, if I ever get a studio started I’ll probably call it Silent Sickies because that’s what we called the old Super-8 films. Also, that Dr. Who film? Yeah, I sent it to Tom Baker who was gracious enough to actually write me a post card which I’ve kept ever since.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
WB: I am silent.sickies@gmail.com and have a YouTube channel as well where I will start uploading those films over time for my cousins to see.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
WB: It’s an awesome forum for everyone to get their visions seen by all — I’ve been coming for a year-and-a-half and its always so friendly and collaborative — it’s just a great experience to be up close and personal with local film makers!

Silk (teaser) will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, November 15th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Nancy Fingerhood, “Mile High Nancy Episode 6: Mom Jeans and Comedy Dreams”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
NF: I enjoy seeing my stories come to life and the creative process of brainstorming with others.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
NF: It is the sixth episode of the web series Mile High Nancy. This is the first screening. It will be on the US Weed Channel.

Q: What else are you working on?
NF: I just wrapped up acting and casting for a new web series called It’s So Brighton.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
NF: One of my actors does an amazing job as a rapper.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
NF: Go to my youtube channel Mile High Nancy.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
NF: I am grateful for the opportunity EFP gives to local filmmakers.

Mile High Nancy Episode 6: Mom Jeans and Comedy Dreams will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, November 15th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Rion Smith, “Rebeccah’s Statement”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
RS: Because I love telling stories and am a visual person.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
RS: It is scheduled to show in Portland Oregon at the HP Lovecraft Film Festival Oct 5, so this will be the second showing on the big screen.

Q: What else are you working on?
RS: Another Lovecraft adaption, but told from the monster’s point of view.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
RS: I can speak Mayan. Seriously.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
RS: Search my name on youtube, I’m the only Rion Smith.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
RS: Love you guys!

Rebeccah’s Statement will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, October 18th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Lewis Leslie, “Mental”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
LL: I have always loved movies. From an early age, I connected with the stories and the characters, and began following actors and directors whose work I admired. I began writing in my early 20s, and instantly fell in love with it. I read all the books, and wrote and wrote and wrote, until I decided that I was ready to start showing my work to people. By age 32, writing alone wasn’t satisfying my creative urges, so I tried my hand at directing. It immediately became a passion that still burns stronger every day nearly a decade later.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
LL: We are screening the psychological horror film Mental. Logline: “When professional insomniac Ty (Emmy-nominated T.O.N.E-z) Brown’s music career hits a slump, he grows frustrated by his future step-daughter’s erratic behavior, and must confront her in order to bring harmony back to the household.” Mental has been submitted to the Telluride Horror Show and Sundance Film Festival, as well as a number of smaller film festivals. It is also being screened for a select group of Hollywood executives.

Q: What else are you working on?
LL: Dream Hero Productions has three feature films in post-production (Strange Company, Battered, Sinners, Inc.), another in development, and we are shooting the short film Deuces about a hobo clown who confronts the grim reaper the weekend of October 20th, 2018.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
LL: Despite being a devout Christian, I have a tendency to gravitate toward the horror genre, where I find the most entertainment and enjoyment from a filmmaking and audience member standpoint.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
LL: You can purchase my first film Killer Ink, which features Peter (Chewbacca) Mayhew, on Amazon, and visit the Facebook page for Dream Hero Productions at www.facebook.com/dreamheroproductions as well as mental at www.facebook.com/mentalhorrormovie

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
LL: The EFP has been a staple in the Denver filmmaking scene for a long time. It was the first place that was willing to screen my short films, and it continues to grow and nurture the local filmmaking community like no other event that I’ve discovered. I am grateful for the EFP, and the encouragement it has brought to my career through the years. Thanks, EFP!

Mental will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, October 18th at The Bug Theatre.

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Meet the Filmmaker: Jacob Thompson, “Not for Me”

Q: Why did you become a filmmaker?
JT: Movies have always been my passion for as long as I can remember. I’ve always wanted to be a filmmaker ever since I was a little kid and it’s an aspiration that’s stuck with me to this day. I make films because I enjoy making them. You could say to my face that I make the worst movies ever made and it wouldn’t discourage me.

Q: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
JT: You’re going to be seeing Not for Me, an experimental project that my good friend, Christian Hutchins, and I worked on for six months back in 2017. You can currently view it on Youtube, Vimeo, and my personal website.

Q: What else are you working on?
JT: I have a script written for an untitled horror/comedy short film. When or if it’ll ever get off the ground remains to be certain. Aside from that, I have plenty of ideas for other films, but nothing concrete. I work part-time and go to community college and don’t have as much downtime as I used to so that makes potential projects rather difficult. I edit a lot in my spare time, but it’s mostly video game fan trailers or really crappy memes that make my inner child snicker. Those are always fun though and a really great way to refine your editing skills.

Q: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
JT: Honestly when it comes to storytelling in my films, I just kinda do whatever the hell I feel like doing. I’m a pretty weird person so naturally my films typically have a weird idiosyncratic sort of style to them. I feel it helps them stand out a bit more. My previous films were primarily comedies or quirky dramas and Not for Me is the first dead serious film I’ve done in this style. It was an interesting process to say the least.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
JT: You can view it on my Vimeo page named after myself or go to my personal website: http://jakebt1998.wixsite.com/jacob-thompson

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
JT: I’m super ecstatic that you’ve chosen my film in your lineup. I think what you’re doing is a great way to get your work out there and connect with other members of the Colorado filmmaking community.

Not For Me will screen at The Emerging Filmmakers Project on Thursday, October 18th at The Bug Theatre.